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Hikari Utsuri

 

Although Hikari Utsuri may be thought of as black-based metallic Koi, it is more correct to view them as the metallic offspring of an Ogon, crossed with either Utsurimono or Showa. Doitsu and Gin Rin versions of Hikari Utsuri also occur.  Hikari Utsuri is a category that covers Showa or Utsurimono that have been crossbred with Hikarimuji to produce a patterned Koi that has a metallic sheen. Showa become Kin Showa, Shiro Utsuri become Gin Shiro, and Hi Utsuri or Ki Utsuri become Kin Hi or Kin Ki Utsuri. At the present time, there are only three varieties in this category.

Last Updated on Friday, 20 December 2013 12:10

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Hikarimoyo

 

 

The show class of the Hikarimoyo is almost the same “catch all” class for metallic Koi as Kawarimono is for non-metallic Koi. It is a relatively modern group influenced by the appearance of the Hikarimuji. The basic Ogon have been crossbred with almost every other variety of Koi to produce the wide range of always fascinating and often spectacular metallic Koi in this group. Hikarimoyo may be described as metallic white based Koi. The exception is of course Ki Kokuryu and Kin Ki Kokuryu that are black-based. Hikarimoyo derive from two distinct sources.

Last Updated on Friday, 20 December 2013 12:10

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Koromo and Goshiki

 

Various Types of the Koromo which means “robed” or “veiled” in Japanese have been developed by crossbreeding Asagi with other varieties. It is a group of Koi patterned similarly to Kohaku, Sanke and Showa with the additional common feature of a vignette or scale reticulation over the red pattern, or in the case of Goshiki, over red and white or white only. They are most easily distinguished by simply referring to the position of the vignette with reference to the other pattern features. The vignette may be blue or black in colour. You may notice that I have also included a short description of the Goshiki under Kawarimono. The reason is that in different countries Goshiki is judged under different varieties. For purposes of appreciating these beautiful Koromo or Goshiki, the variety under which they are judged, is purely academic. Because of the close relationship between Koromo and Goshiki, it was deemed fit to describe them under one heading.

Last Updated on Friday, 20 December 2013 12:10

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Hikarimuji

 

The Japanese word “Hikari” means “shining” and “muji” means “single- coloured” Hikarimuji are single-coloured Koi with an overall dull metallic lustre. The fish most commonly associated with this group are Ogon, but the group also includes metallic Matsuba. To most newcomers to the hobby, this is a little confusing because they see the dark reticulation as a second colour. However, since the colours are merely different shades, with each scale similarly affected, “two-tone” Matsuba are correctly classified with the single coloured Hikarimuji group rather than as a patterned Koi.

Last Updated on Friday, 20 December 2013 12:10

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Bekko

Bekko

 

Shiro Bekko (Sheer-o beh-ko): White Koi with black spots on the upper half of the body (on the back above the lateral line). The black should preferably not be on the head but definitely not on the nose. It should be from the shoulders back to the tail.

 

Aka Bekko (ah-ka beh-ko): Red Koi with black spots instead of white and black.

 

Ki Bekko (Kee beh-ko): Yellow Koi with black spots instead of white and black.

 

The earliest Bekko appeared in the Taisho era between 1912 and1926. It therefore supports the perception that Bekko is a "by-product" of Sanke spawning where either the white is totally absent (Aka Bekko) or the red is absent (Shiro Bekko). Manny proud Sanke owners have ended up with a Shiro Bekko when the hi disappeared during the development on the young koi. Bekko literally means "tortoiseshell" and are either white (Shiro) red (Aka) or yellow (Ki) Koi with black markings. Ki Bekko is very rare, while the Aka Bekko is popular but few are produced. Shiro Bekko is most frequently seen and the specimens are more refined.

Last Updated on Friday, 20 December 2013 12:10

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